Village Web Site Forum

Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Wednesday, December 31, 2014 11:18
100 years on, Sutton soldiers remembered
100 years ago on New Years Eve 1914, the Great War had already claimed the lives of three Sutton servicemen.

"The war to end all wars" had begun less than 5 months earlier on 4th August 1914 and was meant to be over by Christmas. The harsh reality was that the war would drag on for four long years of bloody stalemate.

ARNOLD HEELEY was the first Sutton casualty to lay down his life for King and Country. Arnold lived at 16 Eastfield Place, Sutton and had been in France and Flanders just 6 weeks when he was wounded in action during the Battle of Langemarck. He subsequently Died of Wounds on 23rd October 1914 in Belgian Flanders aged 31 years whilst serving with the Coldsteam Guards. Prior to the Great War Guardsman Heeley had served as a professional soldier with the 3rd battalion of the Coldstream Guards enlisting on 10th March 1900 until his discharge on 9th March 1912. During his 12 years of previous service Arnold fought in the South African Boer war from 15th April 1902 to 4th October 1902 earning the Queen's South Africa medal with 2 battle clasps: 'Cape Colony' and 'South Africa 1902'. He also served in Egypt from 16th January 1908 to 23rd March 1911. After his discharge from the Coldstream Guards Arnold returned home to Sutton where he worked as the caretaker at Sutton Council School from 1912 until his recall as an army reservist at the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914.

WALTER HAGGAS was the second Sutton casualty to lay down his life for King and Country. Walter had previously resided at 23 Daisy Croft, Sutton and had also served as a professional soldier prior to the Great War. He enlisted with the 1st battalion of the Scots Guards in 1911 during which time the battalion departed for a tour of duty in Egypt between 1st February 1911 and 1st January 1913. The battalion was posted at the Kasr-el-Nil barracks on the River Nile. After his discharge from the army in early 1914 Walter joined the police force and started working as a police constable in Bootle. However as an army reservist he was immediately recalled for active service with his former battalion at the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914. Guardsman Haggas landed at Le Havre in France with the 1st battalion of the Scots Guards on 13th August 1914, just 9 days after Britain had declared war on Germany and prepared for the Battle of the Mons. Less than 3 months later Walter was Killed in Action on 11th November 1914 during the Battle of Nonne Bosschen in Belgian Flanders aged 21 years.

FREDERICK WILLIAM THOMPSON was the third Sutton casualty to lay down his life for King and Country. Frederick who resided with his wife Sarah and their 3 young children in Harker St, Sutton had also served as a professional soldier with the 2nd battalion of the Border Regiment prior to the Great War. His service number of 7427 firmly places his enlistment date as mid-1904, although his discharge date is unknown. However by the time of the 1911 census Frederick was no longer serving with the army and was working in Keighley as a foundry labourer. Because of his prior service, Frederick was called up as a 'Mobilised Reservist' at the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914. Pte Thompson landed at Zeebrugge in Belgium on 5th October 1914 with the 2nd battalion of the Border Regiment and immediately engaged the enemy in the defence of Antwerp. 11 weeks later Frederick was Killed in Action on 21st December 1914 in Belgian Flanders aged 30 years.

So as 2014 draws to a close and the new year is about to be ushered in, I think it is safe to say that we owe our current liberty and freedom in part to the courage and sacrifice of the men and women who gave so much for us 100 years ago.
David Laycock
Melbourne Australia
Wednesday, December 31, 2014 14:04
Happy New Year to all on Sutton Web especially Paul for the work he has done in 2014.
David Laycock
Melbourne Australia
Wednesday, December 31, 2014 14:05
Happy New Year to all on Sutton Web especially Paul for the work he has done in 2014.
Brenda Whitaker
Queensland Australia
Wednesday, December 31, 2014 22:56
As Andrew says - we owe a lot to our fore-bearers who sacrificed so much for us all - so with that in mind... Happy New Year everyone - Just an hour to go for you Suttoners - as I type this - whereas we are well into the day.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Saturday, April 18, 2015 09:12
On this day 100 years ago, FREDERICK SIMPSON became the fourth Sutton casualty to lay down his life for King and Country. Frederick was born in Sydney, N.S.W. Australia and served as a professional soldier prior to the Great War. He joined the West Riding Regiment aged 18 on 25th May 1903 serving for 3 years in the army and 9 years in the Reserve. Frederick married Sutton girl Edith Riley in 1910 and the 1911 census shows their address as 36 Main St, Sutton and his occupation as being a cotton warp twister.
However at the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914, Frederick was immediately called up as a 'Mobilised Reservist' with his former battalion. Pte Simpson landed in France with the 2nd battalion of the West Riding Regiment on 14th August 1914 just 10 days after Britain had declared war on Germany. Having survived the battlefields of France & Flanders since August 1914, Frederick was Killed in Action on 18th April 1915 during the capture of Hill 60 in France. He was 29 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Sunday, June 28, 2015 07:12
On this day 100 years ago, NELSON WIDDUP PETTY became the fifth Sutton casualty of the Great War. The family home was 32 Gordon St and Nelson had been a professional serving soldier since 1904 with the 1st battalion of the Lancashire Fusiliers. Prior to the Great War, Nelson saw service in India from 1907 to 1911, Malta, Egypt, Aden and South Africa before returning to India where he gained promotion to Sergeant. At the outbreak of the Great War on 4th August 1914, the 1st battalion of the Lancashire Fusiliers was based in Karachi, India. The battalion was subsequently redeployed to Aden in October 1914 before sailing back to England in December 1914. Nelson took the opportunity to pay a visit back home to Sutton-in-Craven at Christmas 1914 having just received an officer commission to 2nd Lieutenant. On 16th March 1915 the battalion sailed from Bristol to Alexandria in Egypt to prepare for the Gallipoli Campaign in Turkey.

At early dawn on 25th April 1915, the 1st Battalion of the Lancashire Fusiliers landed on W Beach to the west of Cape Helles. The Turks waited until the Fusiliers were almost ashore, then opened fire from deadly hidden machine-guns inflicting 533 casualties that morning, over half its strength. Despite heavy losses and notwithstanding the terrific fire from the enemy, the survivors kept a toehold on the beach and eventually advanced up both sides of the cliff cutting the wire entanglements and driving the defending Turks out of their trenches. The 1st Battalion of the Lancashire Fusiliers won the distinction of 6 Victoria Crosses on the morning of 25th April 1915 and W Beach was renamed 'Lancashire Landing' in honour of the Battalion that had captured it.

Having survived the initial landings at W beach on 25th April 1915, 2nd Lieutenant Nelson Widdup Petty was Killed in Action on the 28th June 1915 aged 30 years. He was shot through the head whilst leading his men forward in a bayonet charge on Turkish trenches.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Friday, August 21, 2015 03:05
On this day 100 years ago, PERCY STELL became the sixth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Prior to joining the army Percy was a member of the Sutton Scouts and was employed as a spinning yarn room oiler. The family home was 15 Gordon St. Shortly after war was declared, Percy enlisted into the 8th battalion of the West Riding Regiment formed at Halifax in August 1914. From Halifax, Pte Stell moved with the 8th battalion to Belton Park at Grantham and afterwards to Whitley Common in April 1915. At the beginning of July 1915 the 8th battalion West Riding Regiment, as part of the 11th Northern Division, set sail from Liverpool and headed for Gallipoli. Pte Percy Stell entered the theatre of war on 7th July 1915 when the 8th battalion landed at Suvla Bay on the Turkish Peninsula to join the Gallipoli campaign. On the 13th September 1915, news was received by Mr and Mrs Stell that their youngest son Pte Percy Stell was reported missing in the Dardanelles from August 2lst. It was later confirmed that Percy had been Killed in Action on this day. He was 19 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Thursday, October 22, 2015 04:21
On this day 100 years ago, JOSEPH GREENWOOD BANCROFT became the seventh Sutton casualty of the Great War. Prior to joining the army Joseph was employed as the assistant manager in the grocery department at the Sutton Mill Co-operative Society and the Bancroft family home was 2 Bridge Terrace, Holme Bridge. He was a regular worshipper and took a great interest in the Young Men's Bible Class at Sutton Baptist Sunday school, being treasurer at the time of joining the army. At the outbreak of the Great War, Joseph volunteered to enlist into the 1/6th battalion of the West Riding Regiment in September 1914. Pte Bancroft entered the Theatre of War on 14th April 1915 when the 1/6th battalion West Riding Regiment landed at Boulogne in France. Six months after arriving in France, Pte Joseph Greenwood Bancroft was Killed in Action in the trenches on the Western Front on the 22nd October 1915. He was 26 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Tuesday, December 8, 2015 05:40
On this day 100 years ago, EDMUND WILKINSON became the eighth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Prior to joining the army Edmund worked as a self-employed oat bread maker in Sutton. He married Steeton girl Alice Sagar and their family home was 1 Wighill St, Holmefield in Sutton where they lived with their 2 young children. At the outbreak of the Great War, Edmund volunteered to enlist into the 1/7th (Leeds Rifles) battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment in August 1914. Pte Wilkinson entered the Theatre of War on 15th April 1915 when the 1/7th battalion West Yorkshire Regiment landed at Boulogne in France. Less than 8 months after arriving in France, Pte Edmund Wilkinson was Killed in Action on the Western Front on the 8th December 1915. He was hit by a shell in a front line trench during a heavy enemy bombardment and was killed instantly. He was 31 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Monday, December 21, 2015 06:51
On this day 100 years ago, NORMAN RILEY became the ninth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Prior to joining the army Norman was employed by Messrs S. Thompson & Son, coal merchants and before that he worked as a worsted weaver. He was single and the Riley family home was 14 Walton St, Holmefield in Sutton. At the outbreak of the Great War, Norman volunteered to enlist into the 9th battalion of the West Riding Regiment in September 1914. He was trained at Bovington Camp, Dorset and later billeted at Wimbourne. He commenced with the rank of Private and was promoted to Lance Corporal. On the 15th July 1915, Lance Corporal Riley entered the Theatre of War when the 9th battalion West Riding Regiment landed in France. Shortly after arriving on the Western Front, Norman wrote a letter home to his widowed mother. He mentioned numerous accounts of events on the front-line including how they could not hear themselves speak because of the heavy bombardment of German positions. After a few months in France, Norman was allowed home-leave back to Sutton for a few days before returning to the front-line. Having served in the trenches on the Western Front for just over 5 months, Lance Corporal Norman Riley received gun-shot wounds to the head on the 19th November 1915. Several weeks later he passed away at 12.10pm on the 21st December 1915 at the 13th General Hospital in Boulogne, France. He was 23 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Sunday, December 27, 2015 04:06
On this day 100 years ago, THOMAS WRIGHT CARSON became the tenth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Thomas was born on the 29th November 1884 at Sunnyside, Sutton-in-Craven. He received a private education whilst boarding at the Royal Grammar School in Lancaster and went on to become a solicitor practising with a firm of solicitors in Llanelly on the west coast of Wales. At the outbreak of the Great War, Thomas relinquished his appointment with the law firm and enlisted into the 2/6th battalion West Riding Regiment in September 1914. He was commissioned with the rank of 2/Lieutenant on the 6th October 1914 and entered the Theatre of War in France the following year on the 3rd November 1915. His brother William Bairstow Carson also enlisted into the West Riding Regiment during the Great War as a Captain. In the first week of January 1916, the mother of 2/Lieutenant Thomas Wright Carson received information from an official report that her son was Missing in Action. He had been in France for less than 8 weeks. Four months later however, official information was received by Captain William Bairstow Carson notifying him that his brother Thomas was reported to have been Killed in Action on the 27th December 1915. He was 31 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Friday, July 1, 2016 03:07
100 years ago today, RICHARD WHITEHALL became the eleventh Sutton casualty of the Great War. Richard had previously served as a professional soldier with the 5th Royal Irish Lancers. He fought throughout the South African Boer War from 1899-1902 earning the Queen's South Africa Medal with 5 battle clasps. By the time of the 1911 census, Richard was now discharged from the army and living in Worsthorne, near Burnley. He was 29 years of age, still single and employed as a cotton weaver. The Whitehall family home was 4, Lister Hill, Sutton before they relocated to 2, Wighill Street, Holmefield, Sutton. At the outbreak of the Great War, Richard enlisted into the 1st battalion of the East Lancashire Regiment entering the theatre of war in France on the 29th July 1915. He was Killed in Action on the first day of the Battle of the Somme on the 1st July 1916 when the British suffered 57,470 casualties, including 19,240 dead - the bloodiest day in the history of the British Army. He was 34 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Tuesday, July 5, 2016 01:58
On this day 100 years ago, HENRY TAYLOR became the twelfth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Prior to joining the army Henry was employed as a worsted spinning doffer at Messrs. T. and M. Bairstow of Sutton Mill. The Taylor family home was Stubbing Hill Farm, Sutton at the time of the 1911 census before they relocated to Sutton Lodge. During the Great War, Henry enlisted into the 10th battalion of the West Riding Regiment in February 1916. Having just arrived on the Western Front in the month of June, Pte Henry Taylor was Killed in Action during the Battle of the Somme on the 5th July 1916. He was 20 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Thursday, July 7, 2016 03:31
On this day 100 years ago, STANLEY ARCHIBALD became the thirteenth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Prior to joining the army Stanley worked in one of the machine shops in Keighley. The Archibald family home was 1, Harker St, Sutton at the time of the 1911 census, although prior to enlistment in 1914 Stanley, his widowed mother and his sister had relocated to Main Street, Sutton. At the outbreak of the Great War, Stanley enlisted into the 8th battalion West Riding Regiment at Halifax in August 1914. From Halifax, Pte Archibald moved with his battalion to Belton Park at Grantham and afterwards to Whitley Common in April 1915. In July 1915, the 8th battalion West Riding Regiment sailed from Liverpool for the Dardanelles. Pte Archibald entered the theatre of war on 7th July 1915 when the 8th battalion landed at Suvla Bay on the Turkish Peninsula to join the Gallipoli campaign. Having survived the Dardanelles campaign during 1915, Stanley was transferred to the fighting on the Western Front in France in 1916. On the 7th July 1916 Pte Stanley Archibald was Killed in Action one week into the Battle of the Somme. He was 21 years of age.
Ian Park
Monday, July 18, 2016 19:04
Hello Andrew hope you are well, been following your column about the history of the men from sutton in the 1st world war, any more information about Albert tune.
He was my mother's cousin think he was killed at thiepval in Belgium in 1916.
If you have anything it would be good to hear.
All the best my friend
Ian Park
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Tuesday, July 19, 2016 05:48
Hi Ian, no new information on Albert Tune since his profile was compiled in 2011. I will be posting a Great War centenary commemoration tribute to Albert Tune here on the 29th August next month. As you correctly point out, Albert died during the battle of the Somme.

Take care Ian ,-)

Andrew
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Wednesday, July 20, 2016 05:17
On this day 100 years ago, THOMAS HENRY SUMMERSKILL became the fourteenth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Prior to joining the army Thomas was employed at Hall and Stell's machine shop in Keighley. The Summerskill family home was 5 Lister Hill, Sutton having previously resided at 8 Ethel St, Sutton. Following the outbreak of the Great War in 1914, Thomas tried several times to enlist into the army for active service but was initially unsuccessful, probably on the grounds of being underage. He persisted and was finally accepted into the 13th battalion Northumberland Fusiliers in February 1916 aged 17 years. Pte Summerskill entered the theatre of war in June 1916 arriving in France to prepare for the Somme campaign the following month. He was subsequently wounded in action during the Battle of the Somme in July 1916 receiving wounds to the right thigh and left leg. Thomas wrote home to his parents from hospital in France informing them that he had been wounded in the 'big push'. The letter said "Just a line to let you know I am wounded and going on well. At present I am in a base hospital, but expect to be sent to England very shortly. My wounds though rather uncomfortable are not serious, one in each leg. I am in good hands and receiving every care and attention possible". However Pte Thomas Henry Summerskill succumbed to his injuries and Died of Wounds at the military hospital at Rouen, France on the 20th July 1916. He was 18 years of age and was also the youngest Sutton casualty to lay down his life for King and Country during the Great War.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Monday, July 25, 2016 05:43
On this day 100 years ago, EVELYN FISHER became the fifteenth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Evelyn had previously served as a professional soldier with the 1st battalion Kings Royal Rifle Corps. His army occupation was listed as Bugler and he served a total of 9 years with the colours from the 5th July 1905 until his discharge from the regular army on the 4th July 1914 and transfer into the army reserve. The Fisher family home was Hazel Grove, Sutton, although Evelyn and his wife Dorothy Starkey lived at 90 Queen's Rd, Gosport near Portsmouth after they were married in January 1914. At the outbreak of the Great War Evelyn was immediately called up as an army reservist to join his old regiment. Rifleman Evelyn Fisher entered the theatre of war on the 13th August 1914 when the 1st battalion Kings Royal Rifles Corps landed at Le Havre in France just 9 days after Britain had declared war on Germany. Having survived the battlefields of France & Flanders for almost 2 years, Rifleman Evelyn Fisher was wounded in action three weeks into the Battle of the Somme and Died of Wounds on the 25th July 1916. He was 30 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Monday, August 29, 2016 05:47
On this day 100 years ago, ALBERT WILLIAM TUNE became the sixteenth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Prior to joining the army, Albert was employed as a worsted weaver at Messrs. T. and M. Bairstow of Sutton Mill. He lived with his mother and sisters at 20 Main Street, Sutton. Following the outbreak of the Great War, Albert volunteered to enlist into the 3/6th battalion West Riding Regiment on the 6th November 1915 at Skipton. After completing his training at Clipstone Camp near Mansfield, Albert was transferred from the 3/6th to the 1/6th battalion and entered the theatre of war in February 1916 after landing in France with the 1/6th battalion West Riding Regiment. On the 12th August 1916 Albert was wounded in action during the Battle of the Somme and returned to the front-line following treatment. 17 days after being wounded, Pte Albert William Tune was Killed in Action on the 29th August 1916 during the Battle of the Somme. He was in an advance trench at the time and was struck in the neck by a piece of shrapnel killing him instantly. He was 27 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Sunday, September 18, 2016 03:01
On this day 100 years ago, CEDRIC FAWCETT HORSFALL became the seventeenth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Cedric was the eldest child of Sir John Cousin Horsfall by his second marriage to Lady Sarah Emily Fawcett. The Horsfall family home was Hayfield House, Glusburn consisting of 10 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms, 4 reception rooms, servant quarters, fine gardens and a picturesque lake. Cedric received a private boarding school education at Westgate-on-Sea in Kent and Uppington school in Rutland before graduating from Kings College Cambridge with a Bachelor of Art Degree. Upon leaving university Cedric entered his father's business at Hayfield Mills, afterwards becoming a partner in the firm. He had a deep interest in politics and was a member of Sutton Baptist Chapel. At the outbreak of the Great War, Cedric volunteered to enlist into the 1/6th battalion West Riding Regiment in August 1914. He commenced as a commissioned officer with the rank of Second-Lieutenant, was subsequently promoted to Lieutenant and again to the rank of Captain in 1916. Cedric entered the theatre of war on the 14th April 1915 when the 1/6th West Riding Regiment landed at Boulogne in France. Within the first 6 months Cedric was twice wounded in action by exploding shrapnel. On the second occasion he was admitted to the Duchess of Westminster Hospital and granted 6 weeks leave of absence from his battalion to recuperate. During this period Cedric married his fiancée Miss Doris May Sutcliffe at St John's Parish Church in her home town of Buxton, Derbyshire in November 1915. The bride and bridegroom left later for the South Coast for the honeymoon. The employees of Hayfield Mills presented Cedric with a grandfather clock with Westminster chimes and a set of pipes. After returning to active service in France, Captain Cedric Fawcett Horsfall was Killed in Action on the 18th September 1916 during the Battle of the Somme. He was 26 years of age. A memorial service to the late Captain Horsfall was held at Sutton-in-Craven Baptist Chapel on the 1st October 1916. Previously he had also been remembered on an elaborate family vault at the front of the old Sutton Baptist Chapel, no longer there following a major clearance of the graveyard when the new modern Chapel was built in the early 1970s.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Sunday, September 25, 2016 04:52
On this day 100 years ago, SAMUEL SMITH became the eighteenth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Samuel was born on the 19th January 1876 at Sutton Mill. His mother Susannah (1843 – 1884) was also born in Sutton whilst his father William came from Glusburn. By the time of the 1881 census the Smith family had relocated to Lancashire near Nelson where Samuel worked as a cotton weaver from leaving school. During the Great War Samuel enlisted into the 29th Company of the Royal Garrison Artillery responsible for manning the outer defenses near Portsmouth and the southern coast defenses. He was stationed at one of the Spithead Forts located in the Solent between Portsmouth and the Isle of Wight, remaining home-based without seeing service in an overseas theatre of war. On the 6th October 1916, the Isle of Wight Mercury newspaper reported that Gunner Samuel Smith had Died of Injuries on the 25th September 1916 at the Northwood Hospital on the Isle of Wight. The circumstances surrounding his “accidental injury and extreme debility” are unknown. Samuel was 40 years of age.
Brenda Whitaker
Queensland Australia
Sunday, September 25, 2016 22:34
Andrew - your research is immense and is surely appreciated by the families of these fallen soldiers. Reading about them is very touching. Thank you for your ongoing efforts.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Monday, September 26, 2016 10:06
Thanks Brenda
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Friday, October 7, 2016 01:15
On this day 100 years ago, SYLVESTER PETTY became the nineteenth Sutton casualty of the Great War. His father William (1840 - 1902) was also born in Sutton whilst his mother Jane (1847 - 1906) came from Eastburn. The Petty family home was 20 Victoria St, Sutton and Sylvester was employed as a weft man in a worsted mill from leaving school. He was an ardent supporter of the Sutton United Football Club and was closely connected with the Sutton Baptist Chapel and Sunday school. After losing both parents within the space of 4 years, Sylvester and his only sibling Edith left Sutton to take up residence at 170 Spencer St, Keighley prior to the 1911 census. Sylvester gained employment as a house painter & decorator, an occupation he relinquished shortly after the outbreak of hostilities. In February 1915, Sylvester enlisted into the 2nd Bradford Pals (18th) battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment formed on the 22nd January 1915. Training commenced at Manningham Park, Bradford before the battalion moved to Ripon. Prior to the 18th battalion relocating to Egypt in December 1915 to complete its training, Sylvester transferred to the 11th battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment. The reason for this battalion transfer is unknown. In April 1916 Sylvester entered the theatre of war in France when the 11th battalion as part of the 23rd Division began intensive infantry and artillery training from the 11th June 1916 in preparation for the upcoming Battle of the Somme. The 11th battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment was involved in numerous actions throughout the 141-day Somme campaign from July to November 1916 including the capture of Le Sars on the 7th October 1916. As the 11th battalion moved in to the assault at 14:00hrs they were at once met by heavy rifle and machine-gun fire from both the front and left flanks. German artillery also shelled the area over which the attack was coming forward with devastating effect. British bombing parties pushed westwards and eventually drove the enemy 50 yards out of their trenches and away from their secured positions. The attack lasted for several hours until the village of Le Sars was secured by the British and consolidated that evening by the 69th Brigade. The 11th battalion West Yorkshire Regiment was left very weak having lost a large number of men including Pte Sylvester Petty who was Killed in Action on the 7th October 1916 during the capture of Le Sars. He was 30 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Sunday, November 13, 2016 03:18
On this day 100 years ago, EDGAR PULLAN became the twentieth Sutton casualty of the Great War. The Pullan family home for more than a decade was Mill Bank Lodge, Sutton where Edgar was "highly respected in the village" and worked as a worsted machine minder prior to his marriage in 1910. By the time of the 1911 census, Edgar, his wife Margaret and their 6 month old son Walter had relocated to 1, Pearl Street, Keighley where Edgar was employed by Messrs. Robert Clough in the weaving department at Grove Mills, Ingrow. Following the outbreak of hostilities, Edgar responded to the call and enlisted into the 2nd Bradford Pals (18th) battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment on the 26th March 1915. Training commenced at Manningham Park, Bradford before the battalion moved to Ripon. On the 22nd December 1915, Edgar landed in Egypt with the 18th battalion to complete training before arriving in France in March 1916 to prepare for the upcoming Battle of the Somme. The 2nd Bradford Pals battalion fought gallantly throughout the 141-day Somme campaign from the 1st July - 18th November 1916 including the final battle of the Somme offensive pitched at Ancre on the 13th November 1916. The Battle of the Ancre was launched amidst a tremendous artillery bombardment in darkness and thick fog at 5.45am on Monday the 13th November. The attackers had to contend with deep mud, heavy enemy fire and poor visibility. The objectives of the battle were not achieved, except in the marshy lowlands near the river where gains were made at great cost. Pte Edgar Pullan was Killed in Action on the first day of the Battle of the Ancre during the final week of the Somme campaign on the 13th November 1916. He was 29 years of age.
David Laycock
Melbourne Australia
Sunday, November 27, 2016 23:23
Thanks from me too Andrew.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Friday, April 28, 2017 02:05
On this day 100 years ago, HARRI WILLIS EDWARDS became the twenty first Sutton casualty of the Great War. Harri was born on the 30th May 1876 in the village of Bishopthorpe 3 miles south of York. By 1879 the Edwards family had relocated to Little Marsden, Nelson and were living in the Vicarage together with 3 servants after Harri's father became the Vicar of St Mary's Church in Nelson. Harri was educated at the boarding school Denstone College in Staffordshire and by 1901 he was employed as a bank clerk in Nelson. In 1905 Harri married Gertrude Louise Bedingfeld in Burnley and on the 20th March 1907 their son Douglas Bedingfeld Willis Edwards was born in the registration district of Keighley. In 1908 Harri's wife Gertrude died aged 28 years. Harri later remarried to Ada Cranswick at the Priory Church in Bridlington on the 12th April 1910. By 1911 Harri, Ada and 4 year old Douglas were residing at Manor Hill, Sutton where Harri devoted much of his spare time to furthering the Boy Scouts movement in the district. He formed a troop of Boy Scouts in connection with St Andrew's Church, Kildwick and became District Commissioner of the Boy Scouts movement. Prior to the Great War, Harri was employed as the bank manager of the Crosshills branch of the Bank of Liverpool. Before this he had been on the staff of the Bank of Liverpool at Keighley for 10 years. At the outbreak of the Great War, Harri endeavoured to join the army immediately, but found considerable difficulty in doing so due to his age. He was eventually accepted and enlisted into the 16th battalion (1st Bradford Pals) West Yorkshire Regiment. In November 1914, the Bradford Daily Telegraph listed the first 1,000 men to join the 16th battalion which included Harri Willis Edwards with the regimental number 16-85. Training commenced at Manningham Park before the battalion moved to Silkstone in December 1914 and then to South Camp, Ripon in June 1915. The battalion arrived in Egypt in December 1915 to complete its training before landing in France in March 1916 to prepare for the upcoming Battle of the Somme fought from the 1st July. After the Somme campaign had finally come to an end in November 1916, Sgt Harri Willis Edwards obtained a commission in December 1916 and was transferred to the 1/5th battalion East Lancashire Regiment as a 2nd Lieutenant. Four months later Harri re-engaged the enemy at Canal Wood close to the Hindenburg Line where the German's had retired to after the prolonged and bloody Battle of the Somme in 1916. A small quarry at the north-east end of the wood had become occupied by a party of German's and these had to be bombed out. Having successfully cleared the quarry of German's, 3 officers including 2/Lieut Harri Willis Edwards and 98 rank and file started to dig in and succeeded in constructing a trench to a depth of about four feet. However this final objective was not reached until around 4.30am the next morning on the 28th April 1917. Following intermittent enemy sniping for an hour or so from various directions, two German companies quickly attacked and succeeded in driving the East Lancashire's onto the road. Here they were heavily swept by machine-gun and rifle fire from the south. 2/Lieutenant Harri Willis Edwards was Killed in Action during this German assault on the 28th April 1917. He was 40 years of age leaving behind a widow and one child.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Wednesday, May 3, 2017 02:11
On this day 100 years ago, four young men became the twenty second, twenty third, twenty fourth and twenty fifth Sutton casualties of the Great War. This was the only occasion during the Great War that multiple loss of life from the township of Sutton occurred in a single day. In no order of precedence using forename alphabetical layout, the following casualties are remembered:

GORDON SMITH was born in Sutton in 1896. During the Great War the Smith family home was Crag View, Sutton. They had previously lived at both Holly Bank, Bent Lane and 5, Raspberry Place, Sutton. As a pupil of St Thomas' Church school, Gordon won a county scholarship and spent 3 years at Keighley Trade and Grammar School. He was subsequently employed in the textile designing department at Messrs T and M Bairstow in Sutton before taking up work as a clerk in the office of his uncle, Mr Andrew Broadhead, a well-known timber merchant at Nelson. In July 1916, Gordon attested under the Derby Scheme and joined the army. He initially enlisted with the Lancashire Fusiliers and together with 6 others, commenced special training to become Drill Instructors. However, shortly afterwards the party was drafted into the Leicestershire Regiment in order to make it up to strength. At the beginning of December 1916, Gordon entered the theatre of war in France with the 8th battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment. Five months later, the Third Battle of the Scarpe was fought from the 3rd – 4th May 1917 as part of the second phase of the British led Arras offensive on German trenches. The 8th Leicestershire Regiment as part of the 21st Division were involved in launching the attack near the Scarpe on the 3rd May. However, having failed to make any significant advances the attack was called off the following day having incurred heavy casualties. Pte Gordon Smith was Killed in Action on the 1st day of the Third Battle of the Scarpe. Initially he had been listed as missing from his battalion since the engagement on the 3rd May 1917. However, more than 9 months later it was confirmed by the War Department that he was presumed killed on this day despite his remains never being identified. He was 21 years of age.

HAROLD WILSON was born in Sutton in 1896. The Wilson family home was 5 Wilson St, Sutton having previously lived at 1 North View, Sutton. On leaving school at the age of 13 years, Harold became a student at Glusburn Institute technical classes before being employed as a junior clerk with Messrs John Woodrow & Sons of Junction Mills. He was connected with St Thomas' Church and Sunday school and was a member of the 1st Troop of Boy Scouts. Following the outbreak of the Great War, Harold enlisted into the 2/6th battalion of the West Riding Regiment. In February 1917 he entered the theatre of war in France and was promoted to the rank of Corporal. Three months later, the Second Battle of Bullecourt was fought from the 3rd – 17th May 1917 after the initial assault to take the village of Bullecourt failed to penetrate the German lines. The second offensive began in the early hours of the 3rd May 1917 with the British attacking the village itself and the Australians attacking the German lines to its east. The fighting was fierce and slow moving. Strenuous resistance combined with confusion between the movements of the different units led to the British being thrown back and out of the village. When additional Allied troops were sent in several days later to reinforce the attack, the British & Australian troops were able to link up and eventually push the Germans out of Bullecourt on the 15th May. German resistance had been ferocious and when the offensive was finally called off on the 17th May, the Allies had incurred massive casualties. Cpl Harold Wilson's battalion had fought in both battles of Bullecourt in the spring of 1917. In the third week of May 1917, the parents of Cpl Wilson received information from unofficial reports that their son was missing in action in France. 10 months later however, Mr and Mrs Wilson received official information that their son Harold was presumed to have been Killed in Action during the great push on the 3rd May 1917. This was the 1st day of the Second Battle of Bullecourt. He was 21 years of age.

JAMES MOSLEY was born in Sutton in 1897. During the Great War the Mosley family home was 23 Croft St, Glusburn. Prior to this they had lived at 13 Campbell St, Crosshills and 14 Gordon St, Sutton. After leaving school, James was apprenticed to the wool-sorting trade at Messrs John Horsfall & Sons of Glusburn where he had also been employed as a junior clerk. Following the outbreak of the Great War, James enlisted into the 2/6th battalion of the West Riding Regiment in February 1916. He entered the theatre of war in France in January 1917. As with Cpl Harold Wilson mentioned above, the 2/6th West Riding Regiment fought in both battles of Bullecourt in the spring of 1917. In the third week of May 1917, the parents of Pte James Mosley received information from unofficial reports that their son was missing in action in France. On the 20th July 1917, James's mother Mary Ann Mosley passed away aged 48 years not knowing the fate of her son. Two weeks earlier she had received the news that her other son L/Cpl John Mosley had been awarded the Military Medal for bravery. This was the first such medal to be awarded to a Glusburn soldier. 10 months later however, Mr Edward Mosley received official information that his son Pte James Mosley was presumed to have been Killed in Action during the great push on the 3rd May 1917. This was the 1st day of the Second Battle of Bullecourt. He was 20 years of age.

WILLIAM BLAKE SPENCER was born at Kildwick in 1888. By the time William was 3 years of age the Spencer family had relocated to 30 Gordon St, Sutton and later to 5 King Edward St, Sutton. After leaving school, William was employed as a bobbin pegger and a weft man in the stock room at Messrs T and M Bairstow in Sutton. Following the outbreak of the Great War, William enlisted into the 2/6th battalion of the West Riding Regiment. He entered the theatre of war in France in January 1917. As with Cpl Harold Wilson and Pte James Mosley mentioned above, William's battalion fought in both battles of Bullecourt in the spring of 1917. In the second week of May 1917, the parents of Pte Spencer received indirect information that their son had been seriously wounded in action in France. One week later however, Mr and Mrs Spencer received official information that their son William had been Killed in Action during the great push on the 3rd May 1917. This was the 1st day of the Second Battle of Bullecourt. He was 29 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Saturday, June 24, 2017 02:46
On this day 100 years ago, WILLIE HARGREAVES became the twenty sixth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Willie was born at Cononley in 1895. During the Great War the Hargreaves family home was 8 Crag View, Sutton having previously lived at 6 Jackson St, Holmefield, Sutton. Prior to the Great War, Willie was employed as a worsted weaver at Messrs T and M Bairstow of Sutton Mill. He was also a scholar of the Sutton Baptist Sunday school. At the outbreak of the Great War, Willie immediately volunteered and enlisted into the 1/6th battalion of the West Riding Regiment in September 1914. He entered the theatre of war in France on the 29th June 1915 when his battalion landed at Boulogne. Within a year Willie had been promoted to the rank of Lance Corporal. In October 1916 he was granted a short period of home leave from the trenches in France having been in the midst of some of the heaviest fighting since the beginning of the Battle of the Somme some 3 months earlier. Whilst on leave, Willie and his fiancee Miss Doris Riley of 14 Walton St, Holmefield, Sutton were married at St Thomas' Church in Sutton on Tuesday the 10th October 1916. Three days later Willie returned to the trenches in France. This was the only occasion he was granted leave from France. The following year on the evening of the 24th June 1917, L/Cpl Willie Hargreaves was Killed in Action by an exploding artillery shell in the front line as he was cleaning his Lewis gun. He was 22 years of age. For Willie's grieving widow Doris, this was her second loss of the Great War following the death of her brother L/Cpl Norman Riley who died from gun-shot wounds to the head on the 21st December 1915. Ironically the names of both these soldiers appear next to one another on the Sutton war memorial as they were both Lance Corporal's in rank.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Monday, September 11, 2017 01:37
On this day 100 years ago, GEORGE FREDERICK THORPE became the twenty seventh Sutton casualty of the Great War. George was born on the 3rd February 1897 at Higher Malsis, Sutton-in-Craven. Prior to the Great War, George was employed in the offices of the Keighley Gas and Oil Engine Company having obtained many successes in the studies of shorthand and book-keeping. He was also a flourishing comedian in a well-known Cowling group of entertainers called 'The Cowling Merrymakers'. Following the outbreak of the Great War and after repeated rejections to enlist, George was eventually accepted into the 20th battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment on the 11th November 1915. His initial training commenced at Clipstone Camp in Nottingham before the battalion moved to Blyth in Northumberland. On the 15th May 1916, George transferred from the West Yorkshire Regiment to the Machine Gun Corps before entering the theatre of war in France the following month on the 10th June 1916. The Machine Gun Corps had an unenviable record for its high casualty rate, earning the nickname 'The Suicide Squad'. Gunner Thorpe took part in the strenuous fighting that took place on the Somme in July 1916. He also saw much active service around Ypres and again on the Somme at Le Transloy where, on the 15th October 1916 he was wounded in action in the right leg. He was promoted to Lance Corporal on the 26th December 1916, to Corporal on the 26th July 1917 and to Sergeant on the 2nd August 1917. The latter two promotions being for special merit and bravery. The following month, Sergeant George Frederick Thorpe was severely gassed on the 9th September 1917. He never regained consciousness and died two days later at a casualty clearing station on the 11th September from gas shell poisoning. He was 20 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Sunday, October 15, 2017 03:09
On this day 100 years ago, HARLAN SMITH became the twenty eighth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Harlan was born in Sutton in 1884 and was the only child of Carey and Margaret Smith of 6 North Street, Sutton. Prior to the Great War, Harlan attended the Pupil Teachers' training classes at Keighley. He gained the King's Scholarship and spent three further years at Leeds University. Upon completion of his studies Harlan became a teacher at Princess Field School in Beeston Hill, Leeds and then at White Hall Road School, Leeds. He also taught at Cleckheaton evening school, Glusburn Technical Institute evening classes and at the Sutton Baptist Sunday school. During the Great War, Harlan enlisted into the Royal Army Medical Corps on the 27th November 1915, initially serving with the Home Hospital Reserve unit. However in April 1916 Harlan wrote a letter to his Commanding Officer asking to be allowed to serve overseas. Eleven months later this request was granted. Harlan embarked at Southampton on the 3rd March 1917, disembarking the following day at Rouen in France. Three weeks later Harlan was posted with the 9th Field Ambulance on the Western Front. On the 27th of July 1917 Harlan was wounded in action but he remained at duty. On the 14th October 1917 Harlan was again wounded in action due to a poisoned gas attack. He was taken to the No 3 Canadian General Hospital at Boulogne, seriously ill from the effects of gas poisoning and bronchial pneumonia. The following day at 10.15am on the 15th October 1917, Pte Harlan Smith died from gas shell poisoning. He was 34 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Sunday, December 3, 2017 02:41
On this day 100 years ago, AMOS WAGSTAFF became the twenty ninth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Amos was born in 1880 at Bradford but by 1901 the Wagstaff family had relocated to 25 Gordon St, Sutton. In the first quarter of 1903 Amos married Sutton girl Gertrude Heeley of 3 Well St, Sutton after which the wedded couple moved to live at 5 Tetley Row, Sutton Mill. Prior to the Great War, Amos worked as a worsted weaver and as a warp twister (mill unknown). During the Great War, Amos enlisted into the 2/5th battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Very little is known about the war time service of Pte Wagstaff. He entered the theatre of war in France around July 1917 and his battalion took part in the Battle of Cambrai between the 20th November and the 7th December 1917. It was during this battle that Pte Amos Wagstaff was Killed in Action on the 3rd December 1917. He was 37 years of age. For his grieving widow Gertrude (nee) Heeley, this was her second loss of the Great War. Gertrude's brother Guardsman Arnold Heeley was the first Sutton serviceman of the Great War to be Killed in Action on the 23rd October 1914.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Tuesday, December 12, 2017 03:33
On this day 100 years ago, WILLIAM ROBERT SIMONS became the thirtieth Sutton casualty of the Great War. William was born in 1892 at South Wigston in Leicestershire, but by 1896 the Simons family had settled in Sutton-in-Craven. Their first home address was 6 North Row, then 4 Lister Hill and then 2 Wighill St. Prior to the Great War, William was employed as an apprentice spinning overlooker at Greenroyd Mills, Sutton. He was also a member of the West Riding Territorials and of the regimental band and was a member of the Cowling brass band. During the Great War, William was mobilised into the 2/6th battalion of the West Riding Regiment entering the theatre of war in France in early 1917. His battalion fought in both battles of Bullecourt in the spring of 1917. In the first week of June 1917, the parents of Pte Simons received information from two unofficial sources that their son had been missing since the great push on the 3rd May 1917. This was the 1st day of the Second Battle of Bullecourt. Two weeks later on the 17th June 1917, Mr & Mrs Simons received a personal letter from their son, dated the 13th May 1917, informing them that he was a wounded Prisoner of War in Ingolstadt, Bavaria. Then on the 9th February 1918, Mr & Mrs Simons received further information in a letter from a French pastor Henri Wesphal in Ingolstadt, Bavaria. It conveyed the news that their son Pte William Robert Simons had died on the 12th December 1917 whilst still in captivity as a Prisoner of War. 12 English comrades were present at the burial of their companion when he was laid to rest the following afternoon on the 13th December at Niederzwehren cemetery in Germany. William was 25 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Thursday, January 11, 2018 04:54
Throughout 1914, 1915, 1916 and 1917, the Great War claimed the lives of 30 servicemen from the township of Sutton. However a sudden exponential rise in the casualty rate saw 19 more servicemen from Sutton lose their lives in the final year of the war in 1918.

On this day 100 years ago, WILLIAM GORDON HAGGAS became the thirty first Sutton casualty of the Great War. William was born in 1890 at New market, Sutton and by 1901 the Haggas family had relocated to 23 Daisy Croft, Sutton. After leaving school William served an apprenticeship as a plasterer under the guidance of his uncle, Mr Fred Davy. In 1912 the Haggas family left Sutton and migrated to the USA establishing a new life in Clark Mills, Oneida County, New York. The only member of the family to remain in England was William's younger brother Walter who had enlisted with the 1st battalion of the Scots Guards the previous year in 1911. However during the Great War, William returned to England and volunteered to enlist into the 7th Depot Company of the Royal Engineers in October 1916. At this stage the United States was a neutral nation until they declared war on Germany the following year on the 6th April 1917. William entered the theatre of war in France in October 1917, but having been in France for only a few weeks, he sustained an injury in the line of duty. This was caused as a consequence of a 'wrench' whilst lifting a heavy weight. He suffered internal haemorrhaging and became seriously ill as a result. Sapper William Gordon Haggas was transferred from France to Newark War Hospital in Nottinghamshire where he died on the 11th January 1918. He was 28 years of age. William's younger brother Walter had earlier been killed in action on the 11th November 1914 whilst serving with the 1st Scots Guards. This was the only occasion during the Great War that two serving brothers from the township of Sutton lost their lives.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Tuesday, February 27, 2018 02:34
On this day 100 years ago, SAMUEL (HARRY) LUND became the thirty second Sutton casualty of the Great War. Samuel was born in 1892 at Slippery Ford on the hillside above Sutton-in-Craven, but was known as Harry throughout most of his life. By the time Harry was 8 years of age the Lund family were living at 15 West Lane, Sutton. After leaving school, Harry served an apprenticeship as a house painter & decorator with Mr Robert Petty at Crosshills. Following the outbreak of the Great War, Harry volunteered to enlist into the army. But a chronic shoulder injury arising from a bicycle accident as a youngster may have initially resulted in him being medically downgraded to the army reserve. In April 1917 however, Harry was mobilised into the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) attached to the Royal Naval Division at Ilkestone in Derbyshire. In February 1918, Harry was transferred to His Majesty's Hospital Ship (HMHS) Glenart Castle where he served as a dispensary clerk with the RAMC. On the 25th February 1918, 206 crew and medical staff of HMHS Glenart Castle prepared to embark from Cardiff bound for Brest in North West France to collect wounded servicemen for return to England. Despite being brightly illuminated with red and green hospital lights, HMHS Glenart Castle was torpedoed and sunk in the Bristol Channel at 03:47hrs by the German U-boat UC-56 on the 26th February 1918. She sank within 7 minutes. At 12:55hrs, more than 9 hours after the sinking, the American destroyer USS Parker spotted the first survivor and came to the rescue eventually picking up 9 survivors from the freezing water, one of whom was unconscious. This man was Harry Lund. These survivors were taken on board USS Parker to Pembroke Dock at Milford Haven in Wales where the unconscious Harry Lund was transferred to the Royal Naval hospital at Pembroke Dock. The following day, Pte Samuel (Harry) Lund died in hospital of heart failure on the 27th February 1918. He was 26 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Monday, April 16, 2018 02:04
On this day 100 years ago, two young men became the thirty third and thirty fourth Sutton casualties of the Great War. In no order of precedence using forename alphabetical layout, the following two casualties are remembered:

On this day 100 years ago, EDGAR GREEN became the thirty third Sutton casualty of the Great War. Edgar was born in 1891 at Low Fold, Sutton. By 1901 the Green family had relocated to Garden Cottage in Sutton, before moving again to live at 2 Daisy Place, Sutton. Prior to the Great War, Edgar was employed by Messrs S Sunderland of Fleece Mills, Keighley. He was a prominent football enthusiast playing outside right in the Sutton Association Football Club, in the Keighley & District and in the Bradford District Leagues. He held medals which were won whilst playing with the Keighley Celtic and Steeton Clubs. He also trained for some time with Bradford Park Avenue football club, playing in some of their reserve team games. At the outbreak of the Great War, Edgar enlisted into the 1/7th battalion (Leeds Rifles) of the West Yorkshire Regiment. He entered the theatre of war on the 16th April 1915 when his battalion landed at Boulogne in France. On the 6th November 1915 Edgar was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for conspicuous gallantry. It is the army's second ranking gallantry award for non-commissioned officers and was almost always seen as a 'near miss for the Victoria Cross'. Edgar received the DCM "For behaving with great gallantry near Turco Farm on the 6th November 1915, in extricating four men who had been buried by shell fire, in full view of the enemy under shell fire from a high velocity quick firing gun." Edgar was subsequently promoted to the rank of Corporal and then Sergeant. In July 1916 Edgar was wounded in action. In August 1917 he was again wounded in action, this time as the result of a gas attack during heavy fighting in France. The following year, the 1/7th Leeds Rifles engaged the enemy at The Battle of the Lys, fought between the 9th and the 29th April 1918. During the intense fighting, Sergeant Edgar Green DCM was Killed in Action on the 16th April 1918. He was 27 years of age.

On this day 100 years ago, ESHTON HAYWOOD became the thirty fourth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Eshton was born on the 23rd November 1895 at 13 Elm Rd, Sutton. By 1901 the Haywood family had relocated to 20 Sun St, Eastburn. After leaving school Eshton was employed as a loomer and twister by Messrs A. E. Matthews & Co at Eastburn. On the 4th July 1914, Eshton's father John died and was buried three days later at Sutton Baptist Chapel. His widowed mother Gertrude was remarried to Isaac Lund of Cowling in the final quarter of 1916, where she and her 5 children relocated to live. Following the outbreak of the Great War, Eshton enlisted into the Royal Field Artillery on the 26th May 1915. He was recruited into the 2nd West Riding Brigade, RFA TF. The following year Eshton entered the theatre of war in France on the 15th April 1916. Driver Eshton Haywood served on the battlefields of France & Flanders with the Royal Field Artillery for exactly two years. He was Killed in Action in Belgian Flanders on the 16th April 1918 whilst conveying ammunition to the guns. Eshton was buried the same afternoon behind enemy lines in the Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery in Belgium. He was 22 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Monday, April 23, 2018 01:33
On this day 100 years ago, FRANCIS JOHN KAY became the thirty fifth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Francis was born in 1893 at Lane Ends, Sutton-in-Craven. By 1911 Francis was living and working as a farm worker with his older sister Eva and her husband Frank Shuttleworth on their farm at High Fold, Lothersdale. He also gained employment as a stonebreaker with Messrs P W Spencer at Raygill Limestone Quarries in Lothersdale. At the outbreak of the Great War, Francis volunteered and enlisted into the 1/6th battalion of the West Riding Regiment at Skipton in September 1914. He entered the theatre of war in France in June 1915. Francis was granted fourteen days home leave from the trenches in November 1917. The following year on the 23rd April 1918 whilst on a short respite behind the firing line, volunteers were invited for the laying of some electric wires. Francis along with others offered themselves for the task. Consequently, Pte Francis John Kay sustained a fatal injury in the line of duty when he was accidentally electrocuted. He was 25 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Monday, April 30, 2018 01:47
On this day 100 years ago, THOMAS HACKSTON became the thirty sixth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Thomas was born in 1889 at Sutton-in-Craven. Shortly afterwards, the Hackston family moved to Broughton near Salford in Lancashire. By 1911 the family had returned to Sutton and were living at 25, Gordon Street. Prior to the Great War, Thomas worked in the designing office at T & M Bairstow Mill, Sutton as a designer in worsted coatings. After the outbreak of the Great War, Thomas and his twin brother William volunteered to enlist into the 1/6th battalion of the West Riding Regiment in October 1914. They were issued consecutive regimental numbers 2708 for Thomas and 2709 for William. On the 5th June 1915, Thomas married his fiancée Miss Elsie Dickinson of Springfield Lodge, Sutton at St Thomas' Church in Sutton. Four weeks later, Thomas and William entered the theatre of war in France on the 29th June 1915 when their battalion landed at Boulogne. The twins served together on the battlefields of France for almost 3 years, except for a brief period when Thomas was hospitalised in England suffering from the effects of gas poisoning. On the 30th April 1918, Pte Thomas Hackston was Killed in Action when an artillery shell burst in his trench. He was 29 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Saturday, May 5, 2018 02:24
On this day 100 years ago, THOMAS DAVEY became the thirty seventh Sutton casualty of the Great War. Thomas was born in 1899 at Kildwick. The following year the Davey family relocated to 3 Overburn Rd, Sutton. When Thomas was 12 years of age he was attending school part-time whilst working as a worsted yarn spinner. He was one of the first Sutton Troop of Boy Scouts and became a very active Scout worker in addition to being closely associated with St Thomas' Church and Sunday school. Prior to the Great War, Thomas worked as a clerk for Mr W Judge accountant in Skipton. Very little information is known about the war time service of Pte Davey. He enlisted into the 1st battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers, entering the theatre of war in France in March 1918. Six weeks later Pte Thomas Davey was Killed in Action on the 5th May 1918 during the German spring offensive of 1918. He was 19 years of age.
Alan Smith
Sutton
Saturday, May 5, 2018 14:54
These superb pen portraits of local lads caught up in what was the biggest catrastophy to befall our great nation make me for one realise how lucky I have been born in 1940,l believe l have seen the best years that our country has enjoyed thanks to those who fought and in some cases made the supremacy sacrifice in two world wars for what ? to see those with the future of our great nation not realising that if we go forward with the present attitude and give it all away in the name of our so called human rights etc,therefor let’s the take future back into our own hands and not rely on those clowns in Brussels who only look after Number One.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Sunday, May 27, 2018 01:10
On this day 100 years ago, JOHN DAVY became the thirty eighth Sutton casualty of the Great War. John was born in 1893 at 6 Sun St, Eastburn, likely to have been his maternal grandmother’s house for the birth as the Davy home address was 3 Baring Square, Sutton. The Davy family later relocated to 2 Daisy Place, Sutton. After leaving school John was employed as a wool sorter at Greenroyd Mills, Sutton. Following the outbreak of the Great War, John enlisted into the 1/4th battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers entering the theatre of war in France sometime after the beginning of 1916. He was wounded in action on the 24th May 1917 in the left arm and leg. After being discharged from hospital at Cromer in Norfolk, John was granted ten days home leave to Sutton before returning to the front line in France. Seven weeks later John was again wounded in action and re-hospitalised. The following year, a massive German offensive known as the Third Battle of Aisne took place between the 27th May and the 6th June 1918. John’s battalion was present when over 4,000 German guns opened up at 01:00 hrs on the 27th May across a 40 km front in one of the most intense artillery bombardments of the war. The Germans fired some two million shells in just four hours. Owing to the heavy concentration of British troops massed together in front-line trenches, casualties were severe with some units being virtually wiped out. The bombardment was followed by poison gas drops. Once the gas had lifted, 17 German Stormtrooper Divisions easily overran the crumpled British front-line. Pte John Davy remained missing ‘presumed dead’ as of the 27th May 1918. He was 25 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Monday, July 2, 2018 05:49
On this day 100 years ago, ERNEST JONES became the thirty ninth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Ernest was born in September 1891 at Low Moor, Bradford. By 1901 the Jones family had relocated to 31 Gordon St, Sutton. Ernest attended Sutton Baptist Sunday school and was a member of the Band of Hope organisation promoting lifelong abstention from alcohol among young people. He worked as a woolsorter at Messrs T & M Bairstow Mill in Sutton after leaving school. On the 6th November 1915, Ernest married his fiancée Alice Grace Brookbanks of Sandy Lane in a ceremony at St Matthews Church, Wilsden, and the following year their daughter Nora Evelyn Jones was born on the 21st August 1916. Their home address was now 1 Mill Street, Sutton. The following year on the 30th June 1917, Ernest enlisted into the 89th Training Reserve of the Labour Corps. After completion of his army training, Ernest was stationed at Catterick Camp Military Hospital consisting of 750 beds, helping out there for almost one year. He was granted a period of home leave, but ten days after his return he was himself admitted to the hospital suffering from influenza. His condition quickly worsened and a few days later, Pte Ernest Jones died of pneumonia at 12 mid-day at Catterick Camp Military Hospital on the 2nd July 1918. His funeral took place at Sutton Baptist Cemetery on the 6th July 1918 attended by a very large gathering including the Crosshills Platoon of the 6th West Riding Volunteers. At the close of the service three volleys were fired over the grave, and the Last Post was sounded. He was 26 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Friday, July 20, 2018 02:13
On this day 100 years ago, PERCY HARGREAVES became the fortieth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Percy was born in 1899 at Sutton House in Sutton-in-Craven. By the age of 12 years, Percy was attending school part-time, whilst working as a worsted spinner. He was later apprenticed to the butchering trade with Mr Gilbert Hargreaves at Crosshills and was closely associated with Sutton Baptist Chapel and Sunday school. During the Great War, the Hargreaves family were now living at 20 North Street, Sutton. After turning 18 years of age, Percy enlisted into the 2/4th battalion of the West Riding Regiment at Halifax on the 14th April 1917. He entered the theatre of war in France on the 31st January 1918. The final major German offensive of the Great War was the Second Battle of the Marne fought from the 15th July - 6th August 1918. This offensive failed when a series of Allied counter attacks overwhelmed the Germans, including the Battle of the Tardenois, fought from the 20th July - 31st July 1918. Percy’s battalion as part of the 62nd West Riding Division was thrown straight into this attack. Several days of very heavy fighting resulted in high casualties for minimal gains. Pte Percy Hargreaves was shot in the abdomen on the 1st day of the Battle of the Tardenois. He was treated in a field hospital but died of wounds the same day on the 20th July 1918. He was 19 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Wednesday, July 25, 2018 03:00
On this day 100 years ago, WILFRID CLOUGH became the forty first Sutton casualty of the Great War. Wilfrid was born in 1897 at 1, Westfield Place Sutton, and by 1911 the Clough family were now living at Stoneleigh, Bridge Rd, Sutton. Wilfrid gained employment in the weft room, before working as a clerk in the office of Messrs T and M Bairstow of Sutton Mill. During the Great War, Wilfrid attested under the 1916 Lord Derby Scheme enlisting into the 12th/13th battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers on June 7th 1916. He commenced his army training at Hornsea and entered the theatre of war in France in October 1916. Wilfrid had been in the trenches for only three days around Armentieres when he received a shrapnel wound below the knee. He spent seven months at a convalescent hospital in Reading. After being discharged from hospital, Wilfrid was granted ten days home leave to Sutton before returning to the trenches in France in June 1917. The following April it was officially announced by the War Office that Wilfrid had been wounded for the second time, and had being missing in action since the massive German spring offensive of 1918. One week later at the beginning of May 1918, Mr and Mrs Clough received a postcard from Wilfrid written from Lemburg in Germany stating that he was a prisoner of war. On the 3rd January 1919 it was reported that Mr and Mrs Clough had received information from the authorities in Germany that their only son Pte Wilfrid Clough had died more than 5 months earlier in a hospital at Mons-en-Chaussee on the 25th July 1918. He was 21 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Friday, August 31, 2018 04:59
On this day 100 years ago, PERCY OVEREND became the forty second Sutton casualty of the Great War. Percy was born in 1896 at Sutton-in-Craven and the 1901 census shows Percy’s widowed mother running the Gardener’s Arms Public House in Sutton. Ten years later the Overend family were living at 11 Elm Rd, until Percy and his sister Susannah moved to Main Street, Sutton following the death of their mother. Percy worked as a farm labourer before taking up employment as a horseman by Sir John Cousin Horsfall & sons of Hayfield Mills, Glusburn. During the Great War, Percy enlisted into the 2/6th battalion of the West Riding Regiment entering the theatre of war in France in January 1917. Throughout the spring and summer months of 1918, the German army launched a number of large-scale, last-ditch offensives to try and win the war before the arrival of large numbers of American troops. On the 27th August 1918, Percy wrote his last letter to his sister Susannah in Sutton. Four days later on the 31st August 1918, Pte Percy Overend was Killed in Action after his battalion took part in a big advance at Arras. He was 23 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Tuesday, September 18, 2018 01:04
On this day 100 years ago, BERTRAM GREENWOOD CLOUGH became the forty third Sutton casualty of the Great War. Bertram was born on the 1st February 1893 at Eastfield Place, Sutton. His mother died during the first quarter of 1893, perhaps as a result of giving birth to Bertram. In 1900 his father married Isabel Dixon from Sutton. They raised Bertram’s two older siblings, whilst Bertram was raised by his mother’s sister (his aunt Lillie Greenwood) at 14 Station Rd, Steeton. There was only a three year age difference between the siblings. Prior to the Great War, Bertram was employed as a warp dresser at Messrs. John Clough and Sons, Steeton. In April 1916 Bertram enlisted into the 11th battalion of the West Riding Regiment, entering the theatre of war in France in the autumn of 1916. He later transferred to the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers (Tyneside Scottish), and then to the Royal Fusiliers. In late 1916 Bertram was wounded by shrapnel, and again in February 1917 sustaining serious wounds to his leg. He was hospitalised for twelve months at King George Hospital in London. Pte Bertram Greenwood Clough was wounded for a third time before being Killed in Action on the 18th September 1918 by an artillery shell whilst advancing on the enemy in the closing weeks of the war. He was 25 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Wednesday, September 19, 2018 03:59
On this day 100 years ago, JOHN SMITH became the forty fourth Sutton casualty of the Great War. John was born on the 9th August 1877 at Sutton Fields, Sutton-in-Craven. Prior to the Great War, John was a senior partner in the firm of Smith & Ibbotson, monumental masons and building contractors of Green Lane, Glusburn. In June 1916 John enlisted into the 10th battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment and entered the theatre of war in France in August 1916. Pte John Smith was Killed in Action on the 19th September 1918. He was a bachelor and 41 years of age.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Thursday, October 4, 2018 01:53
On this day 100 years ago, CHARLES ERIC IVAN CALVERT became the forty fifth Sutton casualty of the Great War. The Calvert family lived at 5 Gibraltar Terrace, Sutton during the Great War, although Charles originated from Pateley Bridge, born there in 1899. Charles was employed by the Irish Lawn Company before enlisting into the 2nd battalion of the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry on September 28th 1917. He entered the theatre of war in France in April 1918. Six months later Pte Charles Eric Ivan Calvert was wounded in action and died at the 12th Central Clearing Station in France on the 4th October 1918. He was 19 years of age.
David Laycock
Melbourne Australia
Monday, October 8, 2018 06:00
Hello Andrew,
Its gratifying to see that you are keeping up the good work recognising the fallen from Sutton.
Were there any casualties/deaths, who fought in the Durham light infantry, and if so where?
I am having difficulty with my Father's records as they were badly burnt in the Kew records office.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Monday, October 8, 2018 14:52
Hi David, none of the 52 Great War casualties from Sutton fought with the DLI, although an additional 241 Suttoners served & returned, some of whom may have enlisted into the DLI alongside your father.

As you point out, fire (and water damage) destroyed 60% of Britain's original WW1 soldier’s records. About 5 million service files from England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales were stored in a War Office warehouse in Arnside Street, London when it was bombed in September 1940 during the London Blitz. So there’s about a 40% chance of finding the charred service record of a British soldier who was discharged between 1914 and 1920.
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Wednesday, October 17, 2018 03:51
On this day 100 years ago, WALTER HYDE became the forty sixth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Walter was born in 1889 in Sutton and lived at 14 North Street for much of his life. In 1910 Walter married his fiancée Annie, from Ripon and the following year their daughter Edith was born. Their home address was 10 Overburn Rd, Sutton. Prior to enlistment, Walter was employed at William Smith & Co joinery works at Crosshills. At the outbreak of the Great War, Walter volunteered to enlist into the armed services, however he was rejected, perhaps on medical grounds. In May 1917 he was finally accepted and enlisted into the 1/6th (Rifle) battalion of the King’s Liverpool Regiment. After entering the theatre of war in France, Walter was gassed on two occasions. He recuperated at the War Hospital at Edmonton before returning to the frontline in January 1918. Rifleman Walter Hyde was then Killed in Action by an artillery shell whilst sleeping by a roadside on the 17th October 1918. He was 29 years of age.
David Laycock
Melbourne Australia
Wednesday, October 17, 2018 08:31
Is there any one with a relative who fought in WW1 in the Durham Light Infantry.
My Father Donald Laycock did, was wounded twice, and returned home to Sutton. His war records were badly burnt and it's difficult to get information.
If some one had a relative etc.I may be able to get some help.
Thanks
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Saturday, October 27, 2018 04:24
On this day 100 years ago, REGINALD SMITH became the forty seventh Sutton casualty of the Great War. The Smith family lived at 4 Walton St, Holmefield, Sutton, although Reginald was born in Leeds in 1898. Prior to joining the forces, Reginald was employed as a twister at Messrs T and M Bairstow of Sutton Mill. During the Great War, Reginald enlisted into the 18th battalion of the Machine Gun Corps in February 1917. He entered the theatre of war in France on Easter Saturday the 7th April 1917. In October 1918 Reginald was hospitalised in the Australian Red Cross hospital at Rouen in France suffering from influenza. Pte Reginald Smith never recovered and died from pneumonia on the 27th October 1918. He was 20 years of age.
David Harrison-Young
Sutton Village Committee
Sunday, October 28, 2018 11:46
Last Night the Officers from Sutton Village Committee were out putting our Tribute to the Fallen up in the Village.

please see the Sutton Village Committee Page on Facebook or follow the link below

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1764467747014551&id=319227944871879

We Will Remember Them
Sutton Village Committee
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Monday, October 29, 2018 11:15
Amazing tribute David by the Sutton Village Committee to the service and sacrifice of so many Suttoners during the Great War.

The red poppy as a symbol of remembrance is of course synonymous to the human sacrifice made during the Great War. The illuminated purple poppy representing the millions of animals used and killed during the same conflict is very fitting.

Great display :-)
Paul Wilkinson
webmaster
Monday, November 5, 2018 21:28
Received from David Pearson

I'm sure many Sutton residents will have watched this evening's 'Inside Out' programme, on which there was mention of the nationwide bellringing taking place on Remembrance Sunday. One of the Sutton fallen, Stanley Duffill, was a bellringer at Kildwick, and he died aged just nineteen on 13th November 1918. The Kildwick ringers are planning to ring a special 'quarter peal' next Tuesday in remembrance of him.

Going back to Remembrance Sunday, the Kildwick bells will be rung in the morning (half-muffled) in remembrance of the fallen, then at 12:30 (without muffles) to celebrate the peace. Finally, at five past seven, in accordance with another national initiative from the Queen's Pageant Master, the bells will be rung again, and for this final ringing the Kildwick ringers are welcoming anyone who wishes to 'have a go', and thus be part of this special centenary occasion.
David Laycock
Melbourne Australia
Saturday, November 10, 2018 12:05
Congratulations to the Sutton Village Committee for their outstanding work on this centenary occasion.
Paul Wilkinson
webmaster
Sunday, November 11, 2018 08:43
from David Laycock in Australia




Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Tuesday, November 13, 2018 01:01
On this day 100 years ago, STANLEY SPENCE DUFFILL became the forty eighth Sutton casualty of the Great War. The Duffill family lived at 13 Wighill St, Holmefield, Sutton, although Stanley was born in Skipton in 1899. Prior to joining the forces, Stanley worked as a doffer in worsted spinning. He was a church bell ringer at St Andrew’s Church, Kildwick and is commemorated on the Roll of Honour of the Central Council of Church Bell Ringers. During the Great War, Stanley enlisted into the 6th battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment. He was wounded in action during the massive German spring offensive on the 24th March 1918 and taken prisoner of war. Pte Stanley Spence Duffill died from influenza whilst still a prisoner in German hands on the 13th November 1918 at Namur in Belgium, and was buried in the cemetery there. He was 19 years of age.
David Harrison-Young
Sutton Village Committee
Friday, November 16, 2018 19:40
On behalf of the Team Thankyou
We are Proud to be able to install the tribute and it certainly seems to be a talking point both on and offline.
Just to update we have put the following online -

As Christmas is now not so far away the SVC Christmas lights will be on display. This year's display has something new 3 lights that will still be lit the season through.
In memory of those who did not return for Christmas with their families our Soldier, Red and Purple Poppies will be lit through til January.
Lest We Forget
Remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice.
David Harrison - Young
Chairman
Sutton Village Committee
www.facebook.com/suttonvillagecommittee
Andrew Monkhouse
Hanoi, Vietnam
Saturday, December 15, 2018 03:39
On this day 100 years ago, PERCY BEAUMONT MIDGLEY became the forty ninth Sutton casualty of the Great War. Percy was born at Drakelow in Derbyshire in 1893. By 1911 the Midgley family were living at 3 Holmefield, Sutton-in-Craven. Percy served his apprenticeship as a painter and decorator, and was employed by Messrs. R. H. Greenwood and Sons, Crosshills. He was also a very active worker at the Sutton Baptist Sunday school. At the outbreak of the Great War, Percy volunteered to enlist into the armed services. He was initially rejected (reason unknown), but was subsequently recruited into the Northumberland Fusiliers in January 1915. On the 2nd March 1917 it was reported that Percy had been wounded in action and had been admitted to a hospital in France. In September 1917 Percy was residing at the Eastbourne rest camp having been invalided back to the UK from France. He made the trip to Sutton-in-Craven to attend his brother’s wedding where he acted as best man. In the first quarter of 1918, Percy was himself married to his fiancée Annie Shuttleworth, their marriage was registered at Skipton. Percy was then transferred from the Northumberland Fusiliers to the 17th battalion of the King's Liverpool Regiment. On the 11th October 1918, one month before the peace armistice ended the war in Europe, Percy set sail from Glasgow with the 17th King's Liverpool Regiment, bound for Murmansk to commence the Archangel campaign in north Russia which was fought until April 1919. Prior to this on the 15th December 1918, Pte Percy Beaumont Midgley became sick and died of pneumonia while serving in Russia. He was 25 years of age.



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